Category Archives: Worldviews

Superstitious Scientists

An evolutionary biologist has determined that religion, especially the “Abrahamic religions,” are superstitions. But there’s a flaw in his analysis. Continue reading

False dichotomy: faith vs. fact

Man looking at paper from oldbookillustrations.com

Everyone has a worldview, and every worldview consists of an underlying network of unprovable presuppositions.  Continue reading

If atheism were true, science would be impossible

perplexed

We value scientific knowledge as the best and highest form of knowledge. A recent article written for National Geographic explained that “in this bewildering world we have to decide what to believe and how to act on that. In principle that’s what science is for.” But is science reliable? Continue reading

Starlight and Time Dilation in God’s Universe

starlight time and the new physics

Time dilation in God’s universe – it’s real. GPS, for example, wouldn’t work if we didn’t understand it. Continue reading

If logic can’t be used to justify reason, can an appeal to irrationality?

kantian noumenalism

Philosophers debate the nature of reality and its link to knowledge. They exclude the Christian explanation from their considerations. The result is chaos. Logic can’t justify its own existence. If being logical can’t explain reason, maybe we should embrace being illogical? Let’s see how that works out. . . . Continue reading

Reason alone is incapable of rationally justifying its own existence

fractals in nature

People are committed to basic beliefs (called presuppositions) which they have not necessarily proven, and yet they interpret all of reality in terms of those presuppositions. They cannot function in this world without first assuming these basic beliefs. Continue reading

How do we go about determining truth and knowledge? Classical problems with no earthly answers.

Colosseum

Historically, there have been three areas of philosophy that philosophers have debated over, and these areas can be illustrated with three questions: what is the nature of reality (metaphysics); how do we know what we know (epistemology); and what is the proper way to live (ethics). Continue reading